IRAAA

22.4

22.4

Price: $8.00
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New, Now, Next

 New artwork and performance art by Jefferson Pinder, Khalif Kelly, and Paul S. Benjamin


The Age of Obama:  Art and Visual Culture

By Valinda Carroll

“From the painting that hung in his Senate office and the campaign graphics to the recent changes to the White House décor, it is apparent that visual art will be vigorously supported during the Obama era,” states preservation manager at Hampton University’s library.  Visual art was a big part of President Barack Obama’s campaign.  The selection of his logo was the first indication that Obama might be someone who cared about design.  Throughout Obama’s campaign, many artists created stunning visual art pieces to show their support for Obama.  Artists such as Ray Noland created a poster campaign for Obama.  Quilt makers also responded to the historic campaign.

 

An Iron Will Commemorated in Steel

By Julie L. McGee

“An art of history connects artist Melvin Edwards and his sculpture, Transcendence, to a man born into slavery in New Orleans in August 1821,” states curator Julie L. McGee of African American Art at the University Museums, University of Delaware.  The 4 ton sculpture, 16-foot, stainless steel sculpture is at the Easton, PA campus of Lafayette College.  The larger than life sculpture, installed September 11, 2008, honors the college’s first African American graduate: David Kearney McDonogh, class of 1844.  McDonogh was perhaps the first person of legal slave status to receive a college degree.  

 

Porter Colloquium at 20

The “Father of African American Art History” & his Legacy

By Teresia Bush

African American art had been studied and exhibited for decades at Howard University, but it wasn’t recognized nationally as a field of study until the late 1980s to early ‘90s.  When Floyd Coleman organized the James A. Porter Colloquium for African American Art in 1989, he envisioned an exchange amongst scholars, curators, artists, students and art aficionados at Howard University that wouldn’t have been possible a decade earlier.  Coleman, professor at Howard University, recognized that a national conference was needed to provide a platform for this growing field.  Coleman wanted to make sure that during these conferences, they focused on the best and most recent research on African American art—a testament to James Amos Porter (1905-1970) a Howard University educator and pioneering art historian who laid the foundation for serious study of African American art history when his, Modern Negro Art was published in 1943.   

 

Collector Juliette Bethea

In Conversation at The National Gallery of Art

By Ruth Fine

The National Gallery of Art initiated the Collecting of African American Art lecture series in February 2008. during this series, NGA curator Ruth Fine interviewed Washington, DC collector Juliette Bethea.

 

How You Like Me Now?

By Michele Y. Washington

 Arem Duplessis's “face lift” of the IRAAA.  Duplessis is one of New York City’s top award-winning magazine designers.  In 2009, Duplessis was promoted to design director at The New York Times. 

 

The Art of Social Design

By Samantha Ragland

 Profile of the Chicago-based graphic designer and illustrator Ray Noland, who often addresses social and political issues in his work.

 

The New Museum of the Mall

By Brad Grant

How the African and African American experience is expressed in the building design by the architecture team of Freelon Adjaye Bond for the National Museum of African American history and Culture that will open in 2015.  Also in this section: Profiles on J. Max Bond Jr (1935-2009) and International Architect David Adjaye.

 

Perfecting a Landmark

By Cliff Hocker & Jacqueline Long

An account on the history and renovation of the Belgian Friendship Building at Virginia Union University.  Originally built for the 1939 New York…was dismantled and reconstructed on VUU’s campus in 1941.  The building contains a monumental relief depicting African American life in the Congo.

 

The Mirror of Michael Jackson

By Pamela K. Johnson

What does the mirror of M.J. tell us about ourselves and our visual culture?

 

East/West meeting of the minds

By Jarvis Dubois

A report on the figurative art today: between east and west symposium at the Phillips Collection in Washington D.C.  Artist participants included Iona Brown, Allan  deSouza, whose work is shown in the report. 

 

King/Hammond at the Helm

Center for Race and Culture-Mica 3rd Annual Conference for African American Art

Notes on Leslie King Hammond’s appointment to Maryland’s Institute College of Art and an announcement of the Transformations: New Directions of Black Art Conference at MICA.

 

Masters on Paper

By Ruth Fine

Comments on the Harmon and Harriet Kelly collection of African American art: Works on Paper exhibition at the Amon Carter Museum.

 

“Out Here: A brief on the California Art Scene”

A survey on 2009 exhibitions in California featuring the work of African American artist such as Kerry James Marshall, Brian Wiley, and Richard Mayhew 

 

New Orleans Story

By Holly Bastien, M.D.

Steve Prince’s lithograph honoring Xavier University President Norman G. Frances. 

 

Ruben Burrell Photographic Archive

By Vernon Courtney

The archive of the legendary Hampton University photographer whose affiliation with the school stems back to 1938 when he entered as a student. 

 

Note on the study in Rome, Italy art fellowship initiated by Hampton University and John Cabot University and American University in Rome.

 

Artists featured in this issue: Jeffrey Pinder, Khalif Kelly, Ray Noland, Barbara Ann McCraw, Ellis Wilson, Tracie Hawkins, Mel Edwards, Curlee Raven Holton, James L. Wells, Eldzier Cortor, Arem Duplessis, Arthur Dupagne, Chakaia Booker, Senga Nengudi, Shinique Smith, Teri Richardson, Paula Wilson, Mickalene Thomas, Mario Cravo Neto, Iona Brown, Allan deSouza, Stanley Sqirewell, Kerry James Marshall, Bryan Wiley, Richard Mayhew, Florence Alexis, Lonel Saint Eloi, Serge Jolimeau, Stanley Agbontaen, Fernando Amorin, Richmond Barthe, Jacob Lawrence, Martha Jarvis, Clarissa Sligh, Senghor Reid, Norman Lewis, Paul S. Benjamin, Afua Richardson, Turtel Onli, Kevin Sipp, Robert Colescott, Charles Clarence Dawson


And more!